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*M1232 RG-33L 6x6

Mine Resistant Ambush Protected

(MRAP) Vehicle/MMPV Type 1

    


Specifications

Country of Origin/Used by: USA
First Produced/Service Dates: 2007
Manufactured by: BAE Land Systems
Crew: 3+8
Armament: Can mount either a protected weapons turret or Remote Weapon System (RWS) carrying (1) of the following weapons: 12.7mm Heavy Machine Gun, 7.62mm MG, 5.56mm MG or 40mm Automatic Grenade Launcher.
Engine: 6 Cylinder Turbo Diesel (Cummins 400)
Miscellaneous Info: The RG-33L 6x6 MRAP (along with its smaller RG-33 4x4 sibling) was one of the many new vehicle types created as a result of the USí 2007 Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle Program (MRAP).  The MRAP program was instituted to procure a large number of mine protected vehicles for all services of the US Military, while utilizing as many viable vehicle designs by as many manufacturers as needed. The vehicle was classified as a Category 2 MRAP; that classification being the mid-level vehicles (by weight, size and troop capacity) of the three (3) classes of MRAP vehicles.  

Like many of the other MRAP designs, the 6x6 RG-33L was envisioned to be used to fulfill multiple missions including Ambulance, Command/Control, Convoy Escort, Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD), Troop Transport, etc. Some of the vehicles would be built with a "base configuration, which could be quickly converted to different roles and back again. On the other hand, other vehicles would be built as specialized variants to carry out individual missions. Unlike the smaller RG-33 4x4 MRAP, the RG-33L 6x6 vehicle was produced in much larger numbers and variants.  The base configuration vehicle was coined the M1232 RG-33L. M1233 Heavy Armored Ground Ambulance (HAGA) and M1239 Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Armored Utility Vehicle (AUV). Another variant, the Mine Resistant Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (MRRMV), was built by BAE Land Systems, but we cannot find any information confirming that it was ever put into service by the US Military.

Soon after the RG-33L went into action, it was quickly determined that they needed additional armor protection to defeat enemy IED attacks; most notably explosively formed penetrators.  They were then fitted with upgraded passive applique' armor packages and thicker ballistic glass. To differentiate the uparmored vehicles from the originals, they were designated as the M1237 RG-33L "Plus" vehicles.

*In addition, the RG-33L was also selected as the Medium Mine Protected Vehicle (MMPV). As the US Military decided to divest itself of many of the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) Vehicles procured over the years, they still identified a number of needs which could be solved by the use of the same/similar vehicles.  One of these needs was to serve as engineer vehicles in point, route and area clearance of mines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IED).

In 2004, the MMPV Program was initiated for this purpose.  In December 2007, the Army chose the RG-33L as the base vehicle for this variant.  It would simply be called the MMPV.  Very soon after this selection, the US Army reassessed their needs for their engineer units, and the expanded Mine Protected Vehicle Family (MPVF) Program was created as a result.  As part of the MPVF, the RG-33L MMPV (now referenced as the Type 1) would still be used, but other vehicles were added to the program.  The other vehicles included in the family are the Buffalo A2 Mine-Protected Clearance Vehicle (MPCV). the Husky Vehicle Mounted Mine Detection (VMMD) System, and the MMPV Type 2 (RG-31 Mark 5E).

The role of the RG-33L MMPV Type 1 is to support explosive ordnance disposal companies, combat engineer units, and chemical biological response teams.  To differentiate these vehicles from the earlier RG-33Lís, they were nicknamed ďPanthersĒ. MMPV Type 1 variants produced include the M1226 Combat Engineer Vehicle, M1227 EOD Vehicle and the M1229 Prophet Enhanced (Signals Intellegence) Vehicle.

Data Sheet Available:   None Available

Photos/Documents

Reference Source/Provider
M1227 MMPV Type 1 Panther EOD Vehicle Photos Anonymous WarWheels.net Supporter
  M1227 MMPV Type 1 Panther EOD Vehicle? Photo U.S. Army
    M1229 MMPV Type 1 Panther Prophet Enhanced (Signals Intellegence) Vehicle Photos U.S. Army
  RG-33L MMPV Type 1 & RG-31A2 Mark 5E MPV/MMPV Type 2 (at Right) Photo US Army
  M1232 RG-33L 6x6 MRAP Vehicle Photo BAE Land Systems
M1232 RG-33L 6x6 MRAP Photos Robert Skipper (See Below)
M1232 RG-33L 6x6 MRAP Vehicle Photos U.S. Army
M1233 RG-33L Heavy Armored Ground Ambulance (HAGA) Photos U.S. Army
  M1239 Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Armored Utility Vehicle (AUV) Photo BAE Land Systems
M1239 Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Armored Utility Vehicle (AUV) Photos Robert Skipper (See Below)
  M1239 Special Operations Command (SOCOM) Armored Utility Vehicle (AUV) Sales Brochure BAE Land Systems
  RG-33L 6x6 Mine Resistant Recovery and Maintenance Vehicle (MRRMV) Photo BAE Land Systems
Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicle Slideshow Presentation (2011) US Department of Defense's Joint Program Office-MRAP via Dave Haugh - Content Editor

References Available

Online

Reference Source/Provider
RG-33L 6x6 MRAP Information and Photos Deagel.com
RG-33L 6x6 MRAP Information and Photos Defense Update.com
RG-33/33L MRAP Information and Photos Army Guide.com
RG-33/33L MRAP Information and Photos Army Technology.com

Printed

Reference Author
Iraq Insurgency: US Army Armored Vehicles In Action: Part 2 (Concord Publications) Carl Schulze
MRAP: Modern U.S. Army Mine Resistant Ambush Protected Vehicles (Tankograd Publishing) Carl Schulze
"MRAP Pt 1" Military Machines International Magazine (September 2008 Issue) Shaun Connors
"MRAP Pt 2" Military Machines International Magazine (October 2008 Issue) Shaun Connors
MRAP Walkaround Photo Reference CD-ROM: Part I Robert Skipper (available directly from author via e-mail)
Special Operations Patrol Vehicles: Afghanistan & Iraq (New Vanguard #179)- Osprey Publishing

Book Review by Patrick Keenan (via Armor Modeling & Preservation Society Website)
Leigh Neville
U.S. Army and Marine Corps MRAPS (Osprey Publishing) Mike Guardia

U.S. MRAPís: In Action (Squadron-Signal Publications)

John Adams-Graf

Hobby Modeling

Kits and Accessories

Model Kit Manufacturer Scale Other Information
       

Model Photos

Reference Source/Provider